May 13, 2014 97 notes Reblog Comments
Anonymous asked
Okay so I have a huge dilemma. Basically, I've been learning how to draw for so long, that I recently discovered that my mind is lacking in the creativity department. You talk about having something to say with your art and I feel utterly ashamed upon realizing that I have been saying *nothing* at all with mine. I think I had more imagination when I wasn't so bogged down with the technical side to it all and I'm wondering if you have any advice for this? I'm seriously at a loss...

2dbean:

A common problem my friend.  We strive for perfection very well knowing we can never truly achieve it.  Yet we try and let it bog us down because

1. It’s easier to quantify the technical side of art

2.  Technical proficiency is the most common way that courses and classes are taught in school

3.  keeping creativity and imagination as an adult is extremely hard when dealing with complicated emotions, bills, and life happenings.

4.  Creativity is subjective way more than learning line weights.

So I believe there is good reason why you, and others feel this way.  I know I did.  In school and for years afterwards.  I can’t say any of this is right, but these things started to work on me.  And of course, this is a constant struggle within the artist.  You will always be trying to balance creation and draftsmanship.  It takes a lot of time and effort to get your hand eye coordination and technical proficiency at a professional level.  Many people simply don’t refocus when they go at it for a spell.  Like I always say, It’s simply about balance.

I suggest a couple of things.  One, I have 2 folders, one in “real life” and one on my hard drive.  Each folder contains images, books, and ideas from my youth.  NOT inspiration like many people do now.  But straight up things that made me want to do this in the first place.  Basically, a folder for my youth.  That I go back to to remember what it was like feeling that way.  Not to draw that way, but that feeling I can hook into and make something that feels the way I used to.  

Doodle for the sake of doodling.  Not for a portfolio, not for anyone online to see and show so you get a couple “likes”.  Draw and doodle for the shear sake of doodling.  Make it a point to know that no one sees it but you.  I have one sketchbook devoted to stuff you will never see other than my wife and I.

(THIS NEXT ONE IS TOUGH)

Find the artist inside and ask him why he is doing any of this.  Find the compelling reason behind it.  If you come up with any of these answers; beats flipping burgers, needed something to do, I like Disney, dunno, or I want to be famous.  Start right this minute, changing your attitude.  Figure out how to make art for the sake of making art.  Not for a portfolio, not for job, and not for someone else out there you think will like it.  Then I think you can start utilizing the artist within and you’ll start to find something to say.

But in no ways is this an easy task.  Trust me, I know.

Remember, this is the first time in history we have this much knowledge, at this speed, at our fingertips.  The artists we all emulate, loved, and appreciated had a much harder time accessing other artists, learning the craft, the amount of distractions, and this free-market company driven idealism wasn’t so strong like we all have now.  The internet has created some amazing opportunities but nothing is one sided.  As I see it, some of this is it’s byproduct.

Sometimes we get too focused on the wrong reasons.  The right reasons, in my opinion, is to create art.  And what you HOPE beyond the creation of art, is that other people will believe in it too.  Whether that be an art director, an HR rep, a fan, or anyone in between. 

If you can make art, and just because you want to make art, it will be inspired.  Even a realist painter is just as creative.  They are picking and choosing colors, grouping shadows, and picking their subject matter.  But they are painting for themselves.  Doesn’t always have to be a “from the imagination creature design.” 

Even if you have to start out small and work your way back to creativity.  It’s there, locked up.  It’s why you started.  And it’s also why you’re not finished. 

Keep at it.

Cheers,

Bean

April 28, 2014 1 note Reblog Comments
Goldilocks Jack Just a prince

Goldilockup

Illustration piece for a children’s story book cover titled 'Goldiclockup' by Mike Allegra. The story is a spin-off of the original, with a fun twist. 

This is my entry for Susanna Leonard Hill’s book cover contest, as well as last week’s sketch dailies’ topic: Goldilocks.

Oh and in case you wonder, the other characters are Jack (from ‘Jack And The Beanstalk’) and a generic “Prince Charming”. :)

April 24, 2014 3 notes Reblog Comments
The Three Wiggly Worms Bluff

An illustration piece I made for a children’s story book cover. This is actually for a contest, held by Susanna Leonard Hill. 
The story is called “The Three Wiggly Worms Bluff” by Wendy Greenley. It’s about a family of worms trying to cross a sidewalk while avoiding being eaten by a hungry robin. Long story short, the three worms made it to safety by smart-bluffing the bird.
All in all, this was a fun personal project. :)

The Three Wiggly Worms Bluff

An illustration piece I made for a children’s story book cover. This is actually for a contest, held by Susanna Leonard Hill. 

The story is called “The Three Wiggly Worms Bluff” by Wendy Greenley. It’s about a family of worms trying to cross a sidewalk while avoiding being eaten by a hungry robin. Long story short, the three worms made it to safety by smart-bluffing the bird.

All in all, this was a fun personal project. :)

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